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2016: SAV Trends in the Hudson River Estuary

sav

Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Trends in Hudson River Estuary

2016 Update

Friday, December 2, from 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM

 

Thank you to everyone who attended the webinar and to our speakers for enlightening us about the ongoing research on SAV in the Hudson River Estuary!  Selected presentations are available in the agenda below.


This webinar was a follow-up to a fall 2014 workshop Restoration of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) in the Hudson River Estuary, which brought together experts to discuss SAV restoration in the Hudson Estuary, following a historic loss of Vallisneria americana after storm events in 2011.

The purpose of the December 2, 2016 webinar was to bring together resource managers, scientists, and others to learn about trends on recovery of Vallisneria americana and related scientific research in the interim.  Next steps in research and monitoring were also discussed.

This is the link to the training event in 2014: SAV Restoration Workshop 2014

 

Agenda

Welcome and introductions – Stuart Findlay, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and Emilie Hauser, NYSDEC HRNERR

Current Status of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Recovery – Stuart Findlay, Cary IES  Findlay Hudson River SAV 2016 Update

Latest Mapping and Interpretation and Trends – Sarah Fernald, NYSDEC HRNERR Fernald SAV Webinar 12.02.2016

Genetics of Vallisneria Americana – Maile Neel and Katia Engelhardt University of Maryland

Results of SAV restoration and “Grasses in Classes” – Chris Bowser NYSDEC HRNERR and River Estuary Program and  Rebecca Houser, NYSDEC Hudson River Estuary Program Houser_BowserSAVwebinar12.02.2016

Discussion – Stuart Findlay

Adjourn and Evaluation

If you have any questions about the webinar, please reach out to Emilie Hauser at emilie.hauser@dec.ny.gov

Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System

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