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Sea Level Rise Projections

Effects of Sea Level Rise in New York State

Intensified flooding and storm surge are an ever-greater threat to New York’s people, infrastructure and economy as sea-level rises. By 2100, sea levels will be 18 to 50 inches higher than they are today along coastlines and estuaries. Now, this vital information will be incorporated into New York development and design plans because of new guidance in the Community Risk and Resiliency Act (CRRA).

On December 31, 2015, the State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) established science-based projections for sea-level rise to guide state adaptation decisions. CRRA mandates that climate risk, including sea-level rise be taken into account when assessing certain permits, facility siting, and funding.

The tables below show the NYSDEC’s sea-level rise projections over different time intervals divided into 3 geographic regions, the Mid-Hudson, the New York City/Lower Hudson, and the Long Island regions. The projections come from the 2014 Climate Change in New York State report.

 

Sea-Level Rise Projections

 

Planning now for sea-level rise will reduce the vulnerability of communities living along New York State’s 1,850 miles of tidal shoreline for decades to come.

Intensified flooding and storm surge are an ever-greater threat to New York’s people, infrastructure and economy as sea-level rises. By 2100, sea levels will be 18 to 50 inches higher than they are today along coastlines and estuaries. Now, this vital information will be incorporated into New York development and design plans because of new guidance in the Community Risk and Resiliency Act (CRRA).

On December 31, 2015, the State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) established science-based projections for sea-level rise to guide state adaptation decisions. CRRA mandates that climate risk, including sea-level rise be taken into account when assessing certain permits, facility siting, and funding.

The tables below show the NYSDEC’s sea-level rise projections over different time intervals divided into 3 geographic regions, the Mid-Hudson, the New York City/Lower Hudson, and the Long Island regions. The projections come from the 2014 Climate Change in New York State report.

 

 

Additional Tools For Mapping Sea Level Rise:

Sea Level Rise Mapper – The Sea Level Rise Mapper is a tool for communities and stakeholders to create visualizations of future scenarios of sea level rise.The data and mapping products displayed on this site are a combination of results from new analyses by Scenic Hudson and existing data from a variety of sources including NYS DEC, US EPA, US Census Bureau, Dr. Roger Flood (SUNY Stony Brook) and FEMA.  Data layers include submerged aquatic vegetation, shoreline types and tidal wetlands.

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NOAA Sea-Level Rise Viewer – This mapper is an interactive tool which allows the user to view some of the potential impacts and extent of sea level rise under differing scenarios at any location throughout the United States.

Hudson River Flood Impact Decision Support System – An interactive map application that allows users to evaluate the scale of potential flooding for tidally-affected shorelines of the Hudson River Valley and the Long Island Sound coast of Westchester County under a variety of sea level rise and storm scenarios. (Kytt McManus, CIESIN, Earth Institute at Columbia University)

For more information about CRRA and sea-level rise projections for NY, visit:

Tivoli Bays Launch Closure – 2019

The canoe and kayak launch on the Kidd Lane access road at Tivoli Bays WMA is closed for renovations until further notice. At this time, DEC does not have an estimated completion date for the project. Please contact Nathan Ermer at 845-256-3047 for more information about this project. Thank you for your patience and understanding.

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