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An Analysis of Shorelines Following Three Historic Storms

What Made Shorelines Resilient

A Forensic Analysis of Shoreline Structures on the Hudson River Following Three Historic Storms is a study that examined six sites on the Hudson River and how they each fared during storms. The sites had either traditional or non-traditional nature-based shoreline stabilization techniques and were impacted by Tropical Storms Irene and Lee in 2011 and Post-Tropical Storm Sandy in 2012. Researchers prepared separate case studies describing each site and the forensic engineering analysis to determine the critical factors that contributed to each shoreline treatment’s performance. Two additional reports describe the  the common project performance factors and methodology used in the project.

The following case studies are available:
Coxsackie
Esopus Meadows
Habirshaw
Hunts Point
Irvington
Oak Point

Common Project Performance Factors summarizes the common themes that were identified through the Forensic Analysis, and presents some recommendations for improving regulation, design, and construction of future projects.

Performance factors include:

  • Impacts from debris during storm events
  • Regular inspections and maintenance
  • Need for proper slopes and stone sizing
  • Mature vegetation

Methodology Report details the methodology behind the Forensic Analysis.

Time Lapse Footage of Shorelines

One result of this analysis was the creation of time lapse footage from aerial photographs. Below you will find a list of videos on how the sites have changed over the decades.

Coxsackie Boat Launch video

Esopus Meadows Preserve video

Habirshaw Tidal Marsh video

Hunts Point video

Irvington Matthiessen Park video

Irvington Scenic Hudson Park video

Oak Point video


For more information on the Forensic Analysis see this presentation from Jon Miller of the Stevens Institute of Technology: Jon Miller, Forensic Analysis

Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System

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